Put Me In, Coach!

I just finished another year of coaching t-ball. Caleb was an absolute stud on the field, and it was clear that watching his brother helped him grow into a great t-ball player. As a team we improved as well. The boys learned how to be better hitters, how to scoop the ball with the glove, and some of them even found first base! (It was a miracle, trust me.)

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As I looked back on the season, I was blown away at the improvement and I was proud of the work we did together. Good coaches make us better, and while I certainly wasn’t Sparky Anderson (if you don’t know him, Google him – worth it), I did my part.

At the end of the season I found myself thinking about coaches. Actually, I was thinking about my coaches. I believe that having a coach is the best way to maximize my potential. I have a coach who helps me with strategic leadership. I have a fitness coach. I have a coach who helps me with discipleship at the church. I have coaches (that’s right – two of them) who help me strive to be a better communicator.

I’ve realized that the best, most elite people in the world all have coaches. From life coach to sports coach – coaches take their players to the next level. The better you want to be in a field the more likely you are to have an elite coach.

I hear people lament about things that are happening in their relationships, but rather than ask for help they are set on trying to fix them on their own. A friend, a relative, even a great book can’t do what a good coach can do. Good coaches are game changers. They have the ability to do something that is impossible to do on your own: They can see the whole picture, and with the whole picture they can help you make adjustments. And after a series of adjustments, they have found a way to support you in being the best.

It is a difficult task to see what you are doing wrong, and even more difficult to change it. If you want the best relationship possible maybe it is time to up your game – find a good coach!